Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Mistakes

Children are incredibly aware of the world around them, and the messages they receive about mistakes- intentional or unintentional- are internalized. If we want our children to be gritty, resilient, risk-takers, we need to be teaching that mistakes are wonderful opportunities to learn. If we want our children to succeed, we need to teach them how to fail.  

Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Family Meetings

A great way to open up or strengthen the lines of communication within your family is by having weekly family meetings.  Family meetings are an effective tool because all members get to have a voice and the freedom to express themselves.  They also teach important life skills such as respectful communication, problem solving, and responsibility. 

On Wednesday, October 17th, I will be holding my first parent workshop of the year from 7pm-8:30pm in the Drama room. In addition to safeguarding, we will also explore the Positive Discipline approach to family meetings. I hope to see many of you there! 

Welcome Back!

As a school counselor, I view listening as the most essential part of my job. When we feel hurt, angry, confused, or even lost, we’re usually not looking for advice but instead someone to listen and validate our feelings.  This is what I hope to offer every person who comes to my office.

The beginning of a new school year can be both exciting and overwhelming. I want to remind the middle school and high school students that I am here to support and listen to them.

 

Gratitude

Most of us were raised to be polite and respectful, and saying “thank you” is an essential piece of good manners.  But for how many of us has saying “thank you” become a reflex, something we mindlessly utter to the shop clerk or bus driver?  How many of us actually spend any amount of time really reflecting on our gratitude?

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Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Special Time

Seisen News

Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Special Time
Cristina Varriale

"Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is gift which is why we call it the present." 

 

Before we all head off for our three week break, I wanted to post the Positive Discipline Tool for the month of December: Special Time.  When I reflect on the Christmases of my childhood, I don't think about the gifts I received.  In fact, I don't remember most of the presents that Santa put under the tree.  What stands out in my memory is the time I spent with my family and friends- baking cookies, watching classic Christmas movies, touring around to look at festive lights, and sharing delicious meals together.  

As I grew into adulthood, Christmas became almost another chore.  It was about running around and buying presents, sending out cards, and organising Christmas parties.  Since moving abroad, I have been able to reconnect with the true meaning of Christmas- sharing that special time with my family and friends.  I no longer stress about buying gifts or sending cards, because I know what matters most is the time I will get to spend with those I hold most dear in the world. 

Positive Discipline recommends scheduling "special time" with members of your family each week.  This is time spent together outside of family meal times.  Time where everyone disconnects from technology and is truly present to each other.  The guidelines offered by Dr. Jane Nelsen for special time is 10 minutes a day for children aged 2-6, 30 minutes a week for children aged 7-12, and a special outing or activity once a month for teenagers.  Parents and children can take turns planning the special time activity or come up with and agree to an idea together.  The benefit of this special time is that it deepens the bond between family members and strengthens the trust.  When this happens, discouraging behavior tends to decrease.

We all live extremely busy lives.  Even small children have massive "to-do" lists that include sports practice, music or dance lessons, extra studies, and household chores.  Unfortunately, too many of us use the "I have no time" excuse to explain why we are not making presence to one another a priority.  I saw a video several years ago that really put things into perspective for me.  Please take a few minutes to watch it.

My Christmas wish for everyone is that we all cherish the time spent with friends and family over the next several weeks.  As Bill Keane said, "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is gift which is why we call it the present." 

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year everyone!

 

Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Mistakes

Children are incredibly aware of the world around them, and the messages they receive about mistakes- intentional or unintentional- are internalized. If we want our children to be gritty, resilient, risk-takers, we need to be teaching that mistakes are wonderful opportunities to learn. If we want our children to succeed, we need to teach them how to fail.  

Positive Discipline Tool of the Month: Family Meetings

A great way to open up or strengthen the lines of communication within your family is by having weekly family meetings.  Family meetings are an effective tool because all members get to have a voice and the freedom to express themselves.  They also teach important life skills such as respectful communication, problem solving, and responsibility. 

On Wednesday, October 17th, I will be holding my first parent workshop of the year from 7pm-8:30pm in the Drama room. In addition to safeguarding, we will also explore the Positive Discipline approach to family meetings. I hope to see many of you there! 

Welcome Back!

As a school counselor, I view listening as the most essential part of my job. When we feel hurt, angry, confused, or even lost, we’re usually not looking for advice but instead someone to listen and validate our feelings.  This is what I hope to offer every person who comes to my office.

The beginning of a new school year can be both exciting and overwhelming. I want to remind the middle school and high school students that I am here to support and listen to them.

 

Gratitude

Most of us were raised to be polite and respectful, and saying “thank you” is an essential piece of good manners.  But for how many of us has saying “thank you” become a reflex, something we mindlessly utter to the shop clerk or bus driver?  How many of us actually spend any amount of time really reflecting on our gratitude?

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